UQ Art Museum

current exhibitions

Curated by Freja Carmichael
Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Freja Carmichael and artworks.
Photo: Simon Woods.

Top left
Maria Ware
reclaimed fishing net (ghost net) 2012
image 46 x 33 x 33 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased with the assistance of Margaret Mittelheuser AM and Cathryn Mittelheuser AM, 2013.

Top right
Abe Muriata
Jawun 2016
twined lawyer vine (Calamus caryotoides)
overall 78 x 53 x 35 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2016.

Centre
Hersey Yungaporta
Basket 2005
cabbage palm fibre with natural dyes
overall 7.5 x 31 x 31 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland. Gift of an anonymous donor to commemorate the University's Centenary, 2010.

Lower right
Rita Wikmunea
Basket 2005
grasses with natural dyes
overall 5 x 25.5 x 25.5 cm
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2006.

Guest curator Freja Carmichael presents Weaving the Way featuring works from the UQ Art Collection. This exhibition makes visible the layers of meaning and wisdom carried in contemporary fibre works by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. Honouring visual languages of the past through form, material and technique, the artists included in this exhibition weave together the spiritual, cultural and historical.

Artist list to be announced.

Freja Carmichael is a Ngugi woman belonging to the Quandamooka People of Moreton Bay. A graduate of UQ’s Master of Museum Studies program (2014), Carmichael is a curator working across the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander visual arts and culture sector. Carmichael recently curated Around and within, Space Gallery, Sydney (2018), and was a co-curator of The Commute, Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane (2018). Carmichael is also a member of Brisbane-based Indigenous curatorial trio, Blaklash Collective. In 2014, Carmichael received an Australia Council for the Arts Emerging Curator’s Fellowship with Redland Art Gallery and was awarded the National Gallery of Australia International Indigenous Arts Fellowship at Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht, The Netherlands (2016).

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Jacobus Capone
Dark Learning 2015 (detail)
7-channel video, high definition, colour, audio duration 0:22:21 mins
Collection of The University of Queensland, purchased 2017.
Reproduced courtesy of the artist.

Jacobus Capone’s Dark Learning (2015) is an immersive seven-channel film installation that unfolds in performative gestures within extreme locales. Dark Learning tests the body and asks questions about our relationship to the natural world and how we come to learn about it. Capone is invested in the Chinese philosophical concept Xuanxue, which literally translates as the learning of the mysterious and profound. Xuanxue encourages a distancing of intellectualisation from actions, instead placing faith in sensation to embrace a deliberate unknowing.

Dark Learning was acquired by UQ Art Museum in late 2017.

Western Australian artist Jacobus Capone is known for his ambitious performances that are often undertaken in remote landscapes without an audience. Capone uses his body to endure extreme conditions as a way of connecting to the environment he is in. He received a Bachelor of Visual Arts, Edith Cowan University, WA in 2007. Recent solo exhibitions include: Double enigma, Michael Bugelli Gallery at ‘the tunnel’, Old Mercury Building, Hobart (2018); Passage, Turner Galleries, Perth (2018); and Forgiving night for day, Perth Institute of Contemporary Art as part of Perth International Arts Festival, Perth (2017). Recent group exhibitions include: Hadleys Art Prize (finalist), Hadley’s Orient Hotel, Hobart (2017); Primavera, MCA (2017); and Ramsay Art Prize, Art Gallery of South Australia (2017).

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Unlearning brings together new and recent artworks, commissions, collection exhibitions, artists and creative thinkers. Running for an extended duration, Unlearning considers the ways in which artists gain, shed and unravel internalised learning about bodies, memory, culture, art, and social interaction, by embracing the idea of ‘not knowing’ through empathy and curiosity. Unlearning is not about forgetting. It is about being comfortable with doubt and strangeness.

To ‘unlearn’ takes many forms: the refutation of ‘old’ or unwanted ideas, the development of new knowledge, altered rituals, different ways of being together or new vantage points. The projects in Unlearning consider labour, repose, memory, history, improvisation, play, and making as potential ways to unlearn. 

Unlearning is the first in a series of extended research inquiries that will investigate and articulate the role of the Art Museum in its broader university context and artistic ecology. Collectively titled An Art Museum in Several Acts, we aim to invert the temporal role of art museums by engaging in long-term conversations with artists, students, and our communities. We will speculate on possible futures of art institutions, collections, and artistic practice with generosity, care, and transparency. 

Lara Merrett
High Stakes

Temporary studio: April 29 – May 10
Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Weaving the Way
Curated by Freja Carmichael
Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Elizabeth Willing
Through the Mother

Front Window Commission: June 4 – December 14
Exhibition: September 10 – December 14

John Baldessari
Wall Painting

In progress: July 26 – August 31

Jacobus Capone
Dark Learning

Exhibition: July 26 – December 14

Opening celebrations for Unlearning: Friday July 26

Friday, 26 July, 2019 to Saturday, 14 December, 2019

Lara Merrett
Reproduced courtesy of the artist, Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane and Tristian Koenig, Melbourne.
Photo: Hugh Stewart.

Sydney-based artist Lara Merrett presents High Stakes: a newly commissioned project in two parts. First, a temporary outdoor studio will inhabit the grounds in front of the UQ Art Museum. Over ten days the artist will host the UQ student community to make visible the practice of painting for the public. This will culminate in a large installation inside the Art Museum. Audiences can make physical contact with the paintings, altering assumptions about what painting can be, and how we can engage with it. 

Lara Merrett lives and works in Sydney. She studied painting at the Círculo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, Spain (1993) before completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts (1996) and a Master of Arts (Painting) (1997) at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales. In February 2019, Merrett will curate and exhibit in Things we do together as part of ARTBAR, Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Sydney. Recent solo exhibitions include: Lady luck, Tristian Koenig, Melbourne (2018); High-rise, COMA Gallery, Sydney (2018); and Paint me in, Bella Room, MCA, Sydney (2018). 

Temporary studio: April 29 – May 10, 2019